Tag Archives: digital edition

Sept-Oct Digital Edition

 

Screen Shot 2019-11-24 at 12.51.42 AMThe Sept-Oct issue of Alaskan History Magazine is available to read online, download, or share via email, Facebook, Twitter or Pinterest at the digital magazine site issuu, an electronic publishing platform which was named one of Time magazine’s 50 Best Websites.

Screen Shot 2019-11-23 at 5.13.34 PMThe 48-page Sept-Oct issue, which carries no advertising in its 8.5” x 11” full-color format, features  the endearing sled dog artwork of Josephine Crumrine’s menu covers for The Alaska Steamship Company to the unprecedented luxury cruise of railroad magnate Edward H. Harriman and his carefully selected passenger list of scientists and artists. An excerpt from a book in progress by noted Alaskan author Tim Jones highlights the importance of a key player in Alaska’s history: the sea otter; and the featured article for this issue is the story of the SS Nenana, the Last Lady of the River, by Fairbanks writer and historian Patricia De Nardo Schmidt. Other articles in this third issue include the history of Alaska’s flag, and an excerpt from Josiah E. Spurr’s 1896 expedition to map and chart the interior of Alaska for the USGS. His unvarnished descriptions of the Birch Creek Mining District are among the first ever recorded. Wrapping up this issue are brief highlights from half a dozen classic books on Alaska’s history, a guide to some of the sources used in researching this issue, and a timeline.

Screen Shot 2019-11-24 at 12.52.11 AMTo help readers become familiar with the online format, the first three digital issues will be free to view by anyone. Digital issues after November 1, 2019 will be available only to subscribers and anyone who purchases the corresponding print issue of the magazine.

To read the first three issues of Alaskan History Magazine online at issuu, click here.

 

 

July-Aug Digital Issue

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The July-August issue of Alaskan History Magazine is available to read online, download, or share via email, Facebook, Twitter or Pinterest at the digital magazine site issuu, an electronic publishing platform which was named one of Time magazine’s 50 Best Websites.

The 48-page July-August issue, which carries no advertising in its 8.5” x 11” full-color format, shares the history of the aviation pioneers known as bush pilots, from the first attempt to climb into Alaska’s skies in 1911 to 1935, when the future of flight in the Last Frontier was well-established and looking bright!

Jul-Aug coverOther articles in this issue explore Alaska’s first newspaper, The Esquimaux, which was published a little northwest of Nome; the Alaska Steamship Company, which became an Alaskan shipping monopoly; a 1916 horseback trip across the Kenai Peninsula by the dauntless world traveller Frank G. Carpenter; Alaska’s first commercially successful novelist, Barrett Willoughby, whose every book was about or set in Alaska, and two were made into movies; and an exciting childhood in the gold rush town of Nome by Irving Kenny, who saw it all first-hand. Wrapping up this issue are brief highlights about Alaska’s early missionaries, the ubiquitous white canvas tent, a half dozen classic books on Alaska’s history, and a guide to some of the sources and resources used in researching this issue.

To help readers become familiar with the online format, the first three digital issues will be free to view by anyone. Digital issues after November 1, 2019 will be available only to subscribers and anyone who purchases a print issue of the magazine. For more information and to subscribe or purchase a single issue (also available at Amazon), visit the Alaskan History Magazine ordering page.

To read the first two issues of Alaskan History Magazine online at issuu, click here.

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May-June at issuu

M:J at issuuThe May-June issue of Alaskan History Magazine is available to read online, download, or share via email, Facebook, Twitter or Pinterest at the digital magazine site issuu, an electronic publishing platform which was named one of Time magazine’s 50 Best Websites.

The 48-page May-June issue, which carries no advertising in its 8.5” x 11” format, is an anthology of excerpts from books published by Northern Light Media, featuring a look at the construction of the Alaska Railroad; a 1918 trip by Margaret Murie, traveling the Fairbanks-to-Valdez Trail as a 16-year-old girl; Addison Powell’s 1902 adventures in the Copper River Valley, the great All Alaska Sweepstakes sled dog race, the 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition in Seattle, and the 1935 Matanuska Colony barns. Shorter articles include a photo-feature of snowshoes, a look at a few Alaskan photographers, and brief reviews of a half-dozen classic books on Alaska.

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The first three digital issues will be free to view by anyone; issues after Sept-Oct, 2019 will be available only to subscribers and anyone who purchases that print issue of the magazine. For more information and to subscribe or purchase a single issue (also available at Amazon), visit the Alaskan History Magazine website.

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In the Mail

20190505_192056The May-June issue of Alaskan History Magazine is in the mail and should be delivered this week to subscribers and anyone who ordered a single issue. If you have ordered an issue or paid for a subscription, and don’t receive your issue by May 10th, please let me know. If you haven’t subscribed or ordered yours yet, you can do so at the Alaskan History Magazine website or send a check or money order to:

Alaskan History Magazine
PO Box 870515
Wasilla, Alaska 99687-0515

20190505_192157A single issue of Alaskan History Magazine is 10.00, a one-year subscription (6 issues) is $48.00 (save $12.00), prices are postage paid to U. S. addresses. Issues will be available soon at Amazon for foreign orders, postage dependent on delivery destination. A digital edition will soon be available free to all subscribers.

Alaskan History Magazine is active on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram; the website address is http://www.alaskan-history.com and the email address is alaskanhistory@gmail.com.

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The 48-page May-June issue, which carries no advertising in its 8.5” x 11” format, features a look at the construction of the Alaska Railroad, with historic photos of bridges halfway built, a narrow trail above Turnagain Arm which would become the rail roadbed, and Anchorage as a city of white tents along Ship Creek. From driving the first spike at Ship Creek to President Harding driving the final spike at Nenana, the story unfolds across 21 years of construction, from 1902 to 1923.

Also featured in the May-June issue is a tale about Margaret Murie, who would become the “Grandmother of America’s conservation movement,” traveling the Valdez to Fairbanks Trail as a 16-year-old girl. Early Alaskan explorer and scout Addison Powell tells of adventures in the Copper River Valley in 1902, and other articles include the great All Alaska Sweepstakes sled dog race, the 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition in Seattle, and the 1935 Matanuska Colony barns. Shorter articles include a photo-feature of snowshoes, a look at a few Alaskan photographers, and brief reviews of a half-dozen classic books on Alaska.

The new magazine is published by Northern Light Media and edited by Alaskan author Helen Hegener, whose books include Alaskan Roadhouses, The First Iditarod, Alaska & the Klondike, “A Mighty Nice Place:” The 1935 Matanuska Colony Project, The Alaska Railroad 1902-1923, The Beautiful Matanuska Valley, and many others. The inaugural issue of the magazine is an anthology of excerpts from her books; future issues will include a wide variety of writers and new features.